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3rd September 2020
By Nick

Read the latest social media recap from Nick, one of atom’s Digital Marketing Specialists.

Facebook continues to think of ways to help businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic with the new paid events options, while the Facebook Shop and Instagram Checkout functions sound exciting for both brands and consumers.

Facebook updates August 2020

Shopping section added on Facebook

This new section, Facebook Shop, allows businesses to display product catalogs to shoppers who can buy items directly through the app. Consumers can browse the new Facebook Shop tab to see a variety of digital storefronts in one place instead of searching for individual retailers or brands. This is integrated with a company’s messaging app so they can answer any customer questions before they make a purchase. [source]

Example of how Facebook Shop will appear on mobile.
Facebook Shop [Credit: Facebook]

Facebook adds new paid events options

These new paid events options provide another way for businesses to generate direct income amid the COVID-19 crisis, bringing their events and services online to reach new and existing customers. Businesses and creators can charge customers directly on Facebook to access their online events.

“By combining marketing, payment and live video, paid online events meet the end-to-end needs of businesses. Pages can host events on Facebook Live to reach broad audiences, and we’re testing paid events with Messenger Rooms for more personal and interactive gatherings,” Facebook explain. [source]

Facebook tests TikTok-style ‘Short Videos’ on its main app in India

Last month Facebook started testing a feed of short-form video clips within the news feed, exclusively in India – where TikTok is currently banned. This includes a ‘Create’ button, which when tapped prompts Facebook Camera to launch. Users can then browse through videos by swiping through a familiar TikTok-style vertical layout. [source]

Instagram updates August 2020

Instagram Checkout launching for US businesses and creators

Facebook will also roll-out Instagram Checkout in the US, allowing companies to sell products directly through the photo-sharing app. Also, Live Shopping is a new feature for checkout-enabled businesses to sell products through Instagram Live in real time.

Instagram Checkout is only available in the US for now [Credit: Instagram]

Businesses can open up a Shop with checkout on Instagram using Commerce Manager, or via integration with platform partners like Shopify and BigCommerce. Selling fees are waived throughout the rest of 2020 to help small businesses during the coronavirus pandemic. [source]

Instagram test All Stories layout on one page

Stories has become a huge feature for Instagram, and a new test has been spotted that would pull in all Stories available to view into one, giant block. This would give users more choice about which Stories to view, instead of the handful of algorithm-dictated accounts that currently show at the top of their feeds. [source]

Twitter updates July 2020

Twitter roll out tweet reply controls for all users

After testing started in May, these new reply control options change the way other users can respond to your tweet. As explained by Twitter: “Before you Tweet, choose who can reply with three options: 1) everyone (standard Twitter, and the default setting), 2) only people you follow, or 3) only people you mention.” Tweets using the latter two settings are labelled, with the reply icon grayed out for people who can’t reply.”

From the testing phase, Twitter revealed that people felt more comfortable Tweeting and more protected from spam and abuse. These new options could give brands the chance to host interviews or make announcements while limiting responses. [source]

Twitter cracks down on spammy ‘copypasta’ tweets

Twitter have updated their policy to stop the spread of “copypasta” (internet slang for text that’s been duplicated from the original post and shared across websites and forums). They could limit the visibility of tweets that have clearly been copy and pasted without any modifications. [source]

Further social media reading: